Planetary Rendering with Mesh Shaders

Martin Rumpelnik
Planetary Rendering with Mesh Shaders
[Thesis]

Information

Abstract

Planetary rendering solutions often suffer from artifacts or low performance when rendering very big terrains with high details. In this thesis, we present a method that targets real-time applications and therefore aims to achieve high performance. The method can be applied with an arbitrary amount of detail, which enables stable performance under runtime or hardware restriction. In contrast to existing methods, like quadtrees and clipmaps, our method avoids artifacts, such as popping or swimming, as much as possible. The method submits coarse, rectangular regions of cells around the viewer to NVidia’s new geometry pipeline that was introduced with their Turing Architecture. Due to the capabilities of the new pipeline, we can make efficient level-of-detail decisions on the graphics processing unit (GPU) and produce work to create circular regions from the rectangular ones. These circular regions provide uniform terrain resolution for the viewer in all directions, while maintaining low rendering times.

Additional Files and Images

Additional images and videos

Additional files

Weblinks

No further information available.

BibTeX

@bachelorsthesis{rumpelnik_martin_2020_PRM,
  title =      "Planetary Rendering with Mesh Shaders",
  author =     "Martin Rumpelnik",
  year =       "2020",
  abstract =   "Planetary rendering solutions often suffer from artifacts or
               low performance when rendering very big terrains with high
               details. In this thesis, we present a method that targets
               real-time applications and therefore aims to achieve high
               performance. The method can be applied with an arbitrary
               amount of detail, which enables stable performance under
               runtime or hardware restriction. In contrast to existing
               methods, like quadtrees and clipmaps, our method avoids
               artifacts, such as popping or swimming, as much as possible.
               The method submits coarse, rectangular regions of cells
               around the viewer to NVidia’s new geometry pipeline that
               was introduced with their Turing Architecture. Due to the
               capabilities of the new pipeline, we can make efficient
               level-of-detail decisions on the graphics processing unit
               (GPU) and produce work to create circular regions from the
               rectangular ones. These circular regions provide uniform
               terrain resolution for the viewer in all directions, while
               maintaining low rendering times.",
  month =      feb,
  address =    "Favoritenstrasse 9-11/E193-02, A-1040 Vienna, Austria",
  school =     "Research Unit of Computer Graphics, Institute of Visual
               Computing and Human-Centered Technology, Faculty of
               Informatics, TU Wien ",
  keywords =   "rendering, real-time, GPU, terrain",
  URL =        "https://www.cg.tuwien.ac.at/research/publications/2020/rumpelnik_martin_2020_PRM/",
}