Information

Abstract

The visualisation of limbs in Virtual Reality (VR) helps to get a better immersion in the virtual world and it creates better confidence in movement. Sadly a lot of VR applications omit the visualisation of limbs. One reason lies in technical difficulties with bigger scale VR environments and multi-user VR environments where you can not rely on outside-in tracking methods because of the size and possible occlusion that hinders accurate tracking data. Another reason is that developers do not want to exclude parts of their already small user base by demanding special hardware for foot tracking that costs as much as the hand controllers but is only usable in a small number of applications. This thesis tackles these problems by generating a lightweight tracking system that only relies on the correct tracking of the head position so that either inside-out or outside-in tracking can be used with it. To achieve this, a RGB depth camera is mounted on the VR headset. A combination of fiducial marker tracking, depth tracking and inertial measurement units (IMUs) are used to track the user’s feet. These individual tracking signals are then fused to one signal that combines the advantages of the single tracking systems. This tracking information can then be used to animate the feet of a virtual avatar with an Inverse Kinematics (IK) algorithm.

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BibTeX

@mastersthesis{Bayer_Alexander_2021_FTiVR,
  title =      "Foot Tracking in Virtual Reality",
  author =     "Alexander Bayer",
  year =       "2021",
  abstract =   "The visualisation of limbs in Virtual Reality (VR) helps to
               get a better immersion in the virtual world and it creates
               better confidence in movement. Sadly a lot of VR
               applications omit the visualisation of limbs. One reason
               lies in technical difficulties with bigger scale VR
               environments and multi-user VR environments where you can
               not rely on outside-in tracking methods because of the size
               and possible occlusion that hinders accurate tracking data.
               Another reason is that developers do not want to exclude
               parts of their already small user base by demanding special
               hardware for foot tracking that costs as much as the hand
               controllers but is only usable in a small number of
               applications. This thesis tackles these problems by
               generating a lightweight tracking system that only relies on
               the correct tracking of the head position so that either
               inside-out or outside-in tracking can be used with it. To
               achieve this, a RGB depth camera is mounted on the VR
               headset. A combination of fiducial marker tracking, depth
               tracking and inertial measurement units (IMUs) are used to
               track the user’s feet. These individual tracking signals
               are then fused to one signal that combines the advantages of
               the single tracking systems. This tracking information can
               then be used to animate the feet of a virtual avatar with an
               Inverse Kinematics (IK) algorithm.",
  month =      oct,
  address =    "Favoritenstrasse 9-11/E193-02, A-1040 Vienna, Austria",
  school =     "Research Unit of Computer Graphics, Institute of Visual
               Computing and Human-Centered Technology, Faculty of
               Informatics, TU Wien ",
  keywords =   "Virtual Reality, Foot Tracking, Motion Capture",
  URL =        "https://www.cg.tuwien.ac.at/research/publications/2021/Bayer_Alexander_2021_FTiVR/",
}