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Abstract

The semiconductor industry has been experiencing an inexorable upward trend since its emergence almost 60 years ago, with ever since advancing technology. The development of continually smaller chips makes it possible to integrate small everyday objects such as keys or watches into the digital world. An important component of these chips are transistors, which are built up internally of at least one semiconductor. This thesis deals with these semiconductors and presents a 3D game developed with Unity3D, which makes it possible to take look inside a transistor and explore it interactively. The player therefore has control of an electron flying through the crystal. However, this flight through the crystal is not free from obstacles. In the middle of the structure there are consistently occurring oxide layers which, if the electrons speed is too low, prevent the passage and repel the electron. Only at a correspondingly high speed is it possible to tunnel trough them. However, the focus is on the fact that the user can adjust the scene, partly interactively, by means of various parameters and thus can generate all possible semiconductor structures. This is not only suitable for viewing and learning different structural shapes and their symmetries, but also changes the playing experience and the degree of difficulty. The implementation is based on cellVIEW, a tool for the visualization of extensive molecular structures, which allows us to perform high-performance rendering of semiconductor structures of often far more than 15 million atoms, which implies, as the results at the end of the work show, really impressively large crystals.

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BibTeX

@bachelorsthesis{Michl_2017_CSV,
  title =      "Generation and Visualisation of Crystal Structures",
  author =     "Gerald Michl",
  year =       "2017",
  abstract =   "The semiconductor industry has been experiencing an
               inexorable upward trend since its emergence almost 60 years
               ago, with ever since advancing technology. The development
               of continually smaller chips makes it possible to integrate
               small everyday objects such as keys or watches into the
               digital world. An important component of these chips are
               transistors, which are built up internally of at least one
               semiconductor. This thesis deals with these semiconductors
               and presents a 3D game developed with Unity3D, which makes
               it possible to take look inside a transistor and explore it
               interactively. The player therefore has control of an
               electron flying through the crystal. However, this flight
               through the crystal is not free from obstacles. In the
               middle of the structure there are consistently occurring
               oxide layers which, if the electrons speed is too low,
               prevent the passage and repel the electron. Only at a
               correspondingly high speed is it possible to tunnel trough
               them. However, the focus is on the fact that the user can
               adjust the scene, partly interactively, by means of various
               parameters and thus can generate all possible semiconductor
               structures. This is not only suitable for viewing and
               learning different structural shapes and their symmetries,
               but also changes the playing experience and the degree of
               difficulty. The implementation is based on cellVIEW, a tool
               for the visualization of extensive molecular structures,
               which allows us to perform high-performance rendering of
               semiconductor structures of often far more than 15 million
               atoms, which implies, as the results at the end of the work
               show, really impressively large crystals.",
  month =      sep,
  address =    "Favoritenstrasse 9-11/186, A-1040 Vienna, Austria",
  school =     "Institute of Computer Graphics and Algorithms, Vienna
               University of Technology",
  URL =        "https://www.cg.tuwien.ac.at/research/publications/2017/Michl_2017_CSV/",
}