Abstraction Techniques for Interactive Illustration

Stefan Bruckner
Abstraction Techniques for Interactive Illustration, 5. May 2005-10. May 2005, Dagstuhl, Germany
[Slides]

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Abstract

Illustrations play a major role in the education process. Whether used to teach a surgical or radiologic procedure, to illustrate normal or aberrant anatomy, or to explain the functioning of a technical device, illustration significantly impacts learning. One of the key concepts for creating an expressive illustration is abstraction. Abstraction introduces a distortion between the visualization and the underlying model according to the communicative intent of the illustration. Inspired by observations from hand-made illustrations, similar techniques for the generation of rendered images have been developed. These techniques work on different levels: low level abstraction techniques (stylized depiction methods) deal with how objects should be presented, while high level abstraction techniques (smart visibility approaches) are concerned with what should be visible and recognizable. We review several existing approaches from both categories and describe important concepts used in the design of a system for creating interactive illustrations directly from volumetric data.

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BibTeX

@talk{bruckner-2005-ATI,
  title =      "Abstraction Techniques for Interactive Illustration",
  author =     "Stefan Bruckner",
  year =       "2005",
  abstract =   "Illustrations play a major role in the education process.
               Whether used to teach a surgical or radiologic procedure, to
               illustrate normal or aberrant anatomy, or to explain the
               functioning of a technical device, illustration
               significantly impacts learning. One of the key concepts for
               creating an expressive illustration is abstraction.
               Abstraction introduces a distortion between the
               visualization and the underlying model according to the
               communicative intent of the illustration. Inspired by
               observations from hand-made illustrations, similar 
               techniques for the generation of rendered images have  been
               developed. These techniques work on different levels: low
               level abstraction techniques (stylized  depiction methods)
               deal with how objects should be presented, while high level
               abstraction techniques (smart visibility approaches) are
               concerned with what should be  visible and recognizable. We
               review several existing approaches from both categories and
               describe important  concepts used in the design of a system
               for creating interactive illustrations directly from
               volumetric data.",
  event =      "Dagstuhl Seminar on Scientific Visualization: Challenges for
               the Future",
  location =   "Dagstuhl, Germany",
  keywords =   "illustration, scientific visualization, abstraction",
  URL =        "https://www.cg.tuwien.ac.at/research/publications/2005/bruckner-2005-ATI/",
}