Konversatorium on Friday, October 11, 2019 - 10:30

Date: 
Friday, October 11, 2019 - 10:30
Location: 
Seminar room FAV 05 (E186 - Favoritenstraße 9, Stiege 1, 5th floor)

Multi-Scale Procedural Animations of Microtubule Dynamics Based on Measured Data (VIS 2019 test talk)

Speaker: 
Peter Mindek (Inst.193-02 CG)
Duration: 
12 + 13

Biologists often use computer graphics to visualize structures, which due to physical limitations are not possible to image with a microscope. One example for such structures are microtubules, which are present in every eukaryotic cell. They are part of the cytoskeleton maintaining the shape of the cell and playing a key role in the cell division. In this paper, we propose a scientificallyaccurate multi-scale procedural model of microtubule dynamics as a novel application scenario for procedural animation, which can generate visualizations of their overall shape, molecular structure, as well as animations of the dynamic behaviour of their growth and disassembly. The model is spanning tens of micrometers down to atomic resolution. All the aspects of the model are driven by scientific data. The advantage over a traditional, manual animation approach is that when the underlying data change, for instance due to new evidence, the model can be recreated immediately. The procedural animation concept is presented in its generic form, with several novel extensions, allowing an easy translation to other domains with emergent multi-scale behavior.

A Comparison of Radial and Linear Charts for Visualizing Daily Patterns (VIS 2019 test talk)

Speaker: 
Manuela Waldner (Inst.193-02 CG)
Duration: 
12 + 13
Responsible: 
Manuela Waldner

Radial charts are generally considered less effective than linear charts. Perhaps the only exception is in visualizing periodical time-dependent data, which is believed to be naturally supported by the radial layout. It has been demonstrated that the drawbacks of radial charts outweigh the benefits of this natural mapping. Visualization of daily patterns, as a special case, has not been systematically evaluated using radial charts. In contrast to yearly or weekly recurrent trends, the analysis of daily patterns on a radial chart may benefit from our trained skill on reading radial clocks that are ubiquitous in our culture. In a crowd-sourced experiment with 92 non-expert users, we evaluated the accuracy, efficiency, and subjective ratings of radial and linear charts for visualizing daily traffic accident patterns. We systematically compared juxtaposed 12-hours variants and single 24-hours variants for both layouts in four low-level tasks and one high-level interpretation task. Our results show that over all tasks, the most elementary 24-hours linear bar chart is most accurate and efficient and is also preferred by the users. This provides strong evidence for the use of linear layouts – even for visualizing periodical daily patter

Web-Interface for neural network feature visualization (VIS 2019 test talk)

Speaker: 
Stefan Sietzen (Inst.193-02 CG)
Duration: 
12 + 13

Excellent explanations of feature visualization already exist in the form of interactive articles, e.g. DeepDream, Feature Visualization, The Building Blocks of Interpretability, Activation Atlas, Visualizing GoogLeNet Classes. They mostly rely on curated prerendered visualizations, additionally providing colab notebooks or public repositories allowing the reader to reproduce those results. While precalculated visualizations have many advantages (directability, more processing budget), they are always discretized samples of a continuous parameter space. In the spirit of Tensorflow Playground, this project aims at providing a fully interactive interface to some basic functionality of the originally Python-based Lucid library, roughly corresponding to the concepts presented in the “Feature Visualization" article. The user is invited to explore the effect of parameter changes in a playful way and without requiring any knowledge of programming, enabled by an implementation on top of TensorFlow.js. Live updates of the generated input image as well as feature map activations should give the user a visual intuition to the otherwise abstract optimization process. Further, this interface opens the domain of feature visualization to non-experts, as no scripting is required.